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Northern NSW Hereford Youth Show Bonnie Smith and Sophie McWhirter and Brooke McWhirter. Pic No: 3440
Nanjing Night Net

Bonnie Smith, Sophie McWhirter and Brooke McWhirter. Pic No: 3441

Ryan Grosser, of Maitland Pic No: 3442

Ally Stanfield, from Wee Waa Pic No: 3444

Ally Stanfield, from Wee Waa. Pic No: 3445

Team effort, loading the hay. Pic No: 3446

Team effort, loading the hay. Pic No: 3447

Team effort, loading the hay. Pic No: 3448

Team effort, loading the hay. Pic No: 3449

Kate Turner. Pic No: 3450

Kate Turner. Pic No: 3451

Anne Starr, Guyra, Ken Ikin, Crookwell, Kate Morris, Bathurst and Pip Hann, Bellata Pic No: 3453

Laura and Claudia Burbury, Coolatai. Pic No: 3454

Laura and Claudia Burbury, Coolatai. Pic No: 3455

Jorjia Durkin, Coolatai, and Camilla Thompson, Duri. Pic No: 3456

Jorjia Durkin, Coolatai, and Camilla Thompson, Duri. Pic No: 3457

Riley Weller, Toowoomba Qld. Pic No: 3458

Riley Weller, Toowoomba Qld. Pic No: 3459

Reevesdale and Tybay team. Pic No: 3460

Brodie and Liam Snaith, Inverell. Pic No: 3461

Brodie and Liam Snaith, Inverell. Pic No: 3462

Rebecca Bennett, Lorne, and Sophie Hann, Bellata. Pic No: 3463

Rebecca Bennett, Lorne, and Sophie Hann, Bellata. Pic No: 3464

Sophie Angel, Toowoomba and Matilda Hann, Bellata. Pic No: 3466

Bonnie Smith and Sophie and Brooke McWhirter. Pic No: 3468

Frank Bundock, Michiel Haynes, Amy Whitechurch and Jake Cracknell. Pic No: 3470

Glenys and Emily Mcdonald, Aiden Faulks and Angus Faulks (Manilla). Pic No: 3471

Glenys and Emily Mcdonald, Aiden Faulks and Angus Faulks (Manilla). Pic No: 3472

Judging of Steers Placings:4, 3, 2. Pic No: 3473

Judging of Steers Placings:4, 3, 2. Pic No: 3474

Judging of Steers Placings:4, 3, 2. Pic No: 3475

Winners Ribbon presented by Anne Starr. Pic No: 3476

Winners Ribbon presented by Anne Starr. Pic No: 3477

Second Place (No3). Pic No: 3478

3rd Place (No2). Pic No: 3479

Winner Steer class. Pic No: 3480

Bulls Class 2: Winner No 7. Pic No: 3481

Bulls Class 2: Winner No 7 Pic No: 3482

Bulls Class 2 second place (8). Pic No: 3483

Bulls Class 2 third place (9). Pic No: 3484

Bulls Class 3 winner No 7. Pic No: 3485

Pic No: 3486

Pic No: 3487

Bulls Class 3 third place No 12. Pic No: 3488

Bulls Class 3 third place No 12. Pic No: 3489

Judging for Grand Champion: R/U (10). Pic No: 3490

Pic No: 3491

Grand Champion No 7 Tybay Jeronimo led by Jessie Ryder. Pic No: 3492

Grand Champion No 7 Tybay Jeronimo led by Jessie Ryder. Pic No: 3493

Grand Champion No 7 Tybay Jeronimo led by Jessie Ryder. Pic No: 3494

Grand Champion No 7 Tybay Jeronimo led by Jessie Ryder. Pic No: 3495

Grand Champion No 7 Tybay Jeronimo led by Jessie Ryder. Pic No: 3496

Grand Champion No 7 Tybay Jeronimo led by Jessie Ryder. Pic No: 3497

Grand Champion Bull, R/U No 10. Pic No: 3498

Grand Champion Bull, R/U No 10. Pic No: 3499

Grand Champion Bull Pic No: 3500

Class 4 Junior Heifers. Pic No: 3501

Junior Heifers winner No 15. Pic No: 3502

Junior Heifers second No 16. Pic No: 3503

Junior Heifers third No 14. Pic No: 3504

Winner class 4 Junior Heifers: No 15. Pic No: 3505

Pic No: 3506

Pic No: 3507

Pic No: 3508

Pic No: 3509

Winner Class 5 Heifers: winner No 20. Pic No: 3510

Class 5 Heifers second place No 21. Pic No: 3511

Junior heifers Class 5 third No 21. Pic No: 3512

Junior Heifers Class 6 winner No 29. Pic No: 3513

Junior Heifers class 6 winner No 29. Pic No: 3514

Junior Heifers class6 second place 25. Pic No: 3515

Junior heifers Class 6 third No 24. Pic No: 3516

Pic No: 3517

Pic No: 3518

Pic No: 3519

Intermediate Heifers. Pic No: 3520

Winner Intermediate heifers: 30. Pic No: 3521

Second No 35. Pic No: 3522

3rd No 32. Pic No: 3523

Grand Champion Junior Heifer: No 29 Jorja Durkin. Pic No: 3524

Grand Champion Junior Heifer: No 29 Jorja Durkin. Pic No: 3525

Grand Champion Junior Heifer: No 29 Jorja Durkin. Pic No: 3526

Grand Champion Junior Heifer: No 29 Jorja Durkin. Pic No: 3527

Pic No: 3528

Pic No: 3529

Res Ch Junior heifer to No 15. Pic No: 3530

Res Ch junior heifer to No 15. Pic No: 3531

Senior Heifers line up: 43 41 39. Pic No: 3532

Pic No: 3533

Pic No: 3534

Pic No: 3535

Pic No: 3536

Pic No: 3537

Pic No: 3538

Winner Class 2 Sen Heifers: No 46. Pic No: 3539

Second sen Heifeirs: No 44. Pic No: 3540

Pic No: 3541

Pic No: 3542

Winner Class 2 intermediate heifers 59. Pic No: 3543

Winner Class 2 intermediate heifers 59. Pic No: 3544

Second Class 2 Inter heifers No 63. Pic No: 3545

Pic No: 3546

Pic No: 3547

Pic No: 3548

Winner Intermediate Heifers: No 59. Pic No: 3549

Second Intermediate heifers: 62. Pic No: 3550

Third Intermediate heifers: 63. Pic No: 3551

Winner Class 12 Inter Heifers: No 66. Pic No: 3552

Class 12 inter heifers second: No 67. Pic No: 3553

Third Inter heifers: No 68. Pic No: 3554

Jodie Weller of Toowoomba instructing Ashleigh Aitken and Sophie Hann. Pic No: 2

Jodie Weller and Ashleigh Aitken Pic No: 3

Stalled, fed and watered. Pic No: 4

Committee member, Will Vivers Pic No: 5

Peter Donnelly of Glen Innes with son Lachlan. Pic No: 6

Ben Fraser and Hugo Monie. Pic No: 7

Leisel Cooper. Pic No: 8

Pic No: 9

Ally Stanfield Pic No: 10

Lectures. Pic No: 11

Lectures. Pic No: 12

Pic No: 13

Frank Bundock. Pic No: 14

Frank Bundock. Pic No: 15

Here Dad hold this. Pic No: 16

Ben Fraser. Pic No: 17

Sophie Hann. Pic No: 18

Pic No: 19

Judge Ian Durkin of Coolatai listening to Hugo Monie give his judging comments. Pic No: 20

Peewees waiting their turn. Pic No: 21

Ashleigh Aitken. Pic No: 22

Ashleigh Aitken. Pic No: 23

Ashleigh Aitken. Pic No: 24

Ashleigh Aitken. Pic No: 25

Lucy Ball. Pic No: 26

Lucy Ball. Pic No: 27

Lucy Ball. Pic No: 28

Lucy Ball. Pic No: 29

Leisel Cooper. Pic No: 30

Leisel Cooper. Pic No: 31

Ally Stanfield and Mum. Pic No: 32

Ally Stanfield and mum. Pic No: 33

Machiel Haynes. Pic No: 34

Machiel Haynes. Pic No: 35

Lucy Ball watering. Pic No: 36

Cameron Jones Pic No: 37

Cameron Jones. Pic No: 38

Cameron Jones. Pic No: 39

Cameron Jones. Pic No: 40

Cameron Jones. Pic No: 41

Cameron Jones. Pic No: 42

Toby Powell. Pic No: 43

Peewees waiting their turn. Pic No: 44

Michael Ball of Armidale. Pic No: 45

Sarah Stanfield. Pic No: 46

Peewees. Pic No: 47

Pic No: 48

Sophie Hann, Nathan Grosser and Lucy Ball. Pic No: 49

Jane Leake helping Sam Aitken. Pic No: 50

Sam Aitken. Pic No: 51

Jane Leake helping Drew Weller. Pic No: 52

Jane Leake helping Drew Weller. Pic No: 53

Liam Snaith. Pic No: 54

Liam Snaith. Pic No: 55

Amy Whitchurch. Pic No: 37

Future cattlemen: Max Stewart, Riley Weller and Jack Aitken. Pic No: 57

Oscar Monie. Pic No: 58

Max Stewart, Riley Weller and Jack Aitken. Pic No: 59

Max Stewart, Riley Weller and Jack Aitken. Pic No: 60

Max Stewart, Riley Weller and Jack Aitken. Pic No: 61

Oscar Monie. Pic No: 62

Tom Ball. Pic No: 63

Jorja Durkin. Pic No: 64

Jorja Durkin. Pic No: 65

Jorja Durkin. Pic No: 66

Jorja Durkin. Pic No: 67

Cilla Monie. Pic No: 68

Cilla Monie. Pic No: 69

Pic No: 72

Riley Weller. Pic No: 73

Riley Weller. Pic No: 74

Committee members Will Vivers and Emily Rabone. Pic No: 76

Committee members Will Vivers and Emily Rabone. Pic No: 79

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STREAK: Bathurst members from the Western Districts Masters 63s team going for their fourth straight title in March, from left, Rick McDonald (manager), Ian Clews, Dennis Harvey, Dave Weal, Peter Dodds and John Willott. Photo: PHILL MURRAY 010815pvetsHOCKEY
Nanjing Night Net

BATHURST is not only looking forward to playing host to the Men’s 55s and 63s NSW Masters Hockey Championship in March, but are hopeful of maintaining their dominant position in the age groups.

Players from around the Central West band together each year to form the Western Districts side, one that in the 63s division is aiming for its fourth straight state title.

The competition runs from March 20-22 and the host city’s players begin their training this Thursday as they get ready to defend that streak.

Not only does the competition fall in Bathurst’s bicentenary year but it also marks 30 years since Bathurst claimed its first ever Veterans, now Masters, title.

“The 63s have won it for the last three years … The 55 ones played in the final in 2013 as well,” team manager Rick McDonald said.

“These two age groups are always very competitive across the park. If you took out the Masters players from the Bathurst association there wouldn’t be as many teams running around because those players make up a lot of the sides. They’re there to help the juniors come along.”

Last year the over 55s one side made it, against the odds, to the semi-final stage where their run was eventually brought to an end at the hands of Newcastle.

That effort was made all the more impressive given the team only 11 operated with players.

The team is hopeful of equalling that strong effort in 2015 thanks to some players moving up into their ranks from last year’s 50s side.

The second division over 55s team enjoyed a good result as they too claimed a semi-final finish in 2014. Once again the numbers will allow Western Districts to field two sides in that age group.

McDonald said having three fields at Bathurst continues to make it a prime candidate for hosting Masters events.

“The reason they liked Bathurst to have it is that we have three turfs. Having three turfs means you can spread the games out a bit more,” he said.

“The last couple of years it’s been up at Grafton and with two turfs they have a very tight time frame.”

Team member of the 63s, Dennis Harvey, said people shouldn’t underestimate how exciting and quick the senior-most Masters age group can be.

“It’s amazing how competitive it can be at that age. You would think that it would drop off, but it doesn’t,” he said.

“We play a Western Districts side in this competition mainly because we don’t get enough players from Bathurst.

“Parkes and Lithgow don’t quite have enough either, so we join forces to make a team. We get some very talented plays come on board.”

The titles will run from March 20-22.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

ON THE BALL: Horsham Panthers Rugby League players Roi G, Josh Hiku and Owen Swinnerton prepare for the club’s first match. The team went down to the Eastern Dragons 44-18 but took plenty of positives out of the game. Picture: PAUL CARRACHERTHE Horsham Panthersplayed their firstgame in the MountGambier RugbyLeague competition atthe weekend.
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Horsham forwardSean McMaughan saidwhile the team lost tothe Eastern Dragons44-18, there were lotsof positives in thegame.

‘‘I think we weredefinitely competitivefor most of the game,’’he said.

‘‘Fitness let us downa bit and for a lot of theguys it was their firstgame, but they playedwell, there was nodoubt about that.’’

McMaughan said itwas great to see plentyof supporters come towatch the team in itsfirst competitionmatch.

‘‘We had a lot ofpeople who saw thestory in the WimmeraMail-Times and droveall the way to Naracoorteto watch us,’’ hesaid.

‘‘We had a few familymembers out therebut to have the communityat large comeand be part of it wasvery encouraging.’’

McMaughan saidthe team started offwell, but fell away inthe second half.

‘‘We did well withthe ball in hand, andwould have done betterbut we dropped acouple of balls overthe try line,’’ he said.

‘‘We need to improvethe defence abit, but we had guyswho have never playedbefore and probablydon’t understandsome of the things likekeeping a straightline.’’

The Panthers have abye this week and willtake on the Blue LakeKnights on January 24.

McMaughan said anyone interested inplaying could call himon 0409 871 262.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Marty Moses.
Nanjing Night Net

The Australian Wool Exchange (AWI) eastern market indicatorclosed at 1059c posting no change in the pre Christmas market close.

It was a pleasing result for the 53,000 bales offering because it overcame a price drop of 2c before 1c installments during the following two days.

Despite the solid EMI the Merino MPG’s drifted lower over the course of the week, mostly ending 5 to 15c below pre-Christmas levels.

Merino skirtings mirrored the fleece sector, easing by around 10c, whilethe crossbreds posted further rises this week with increases of up to 30c experienced for the 28-30-micron which sit on or near historic highs.

Merino cardings extended their pre-Christmas rally posting 10-20c rises.

A total of 56,047 bales are expected to be met with good support at theauction series.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR:
Nanjing Night Net

OVER several years my wife and I donated used clothing to charities in Sale.

The clothing was always washed, ironed and folded, not placed in boxes but handed into the shop, suitable for immediate display.

During the Christmas period I walked past a collection bin in Raymond St, Sale.

On the pavement by the box was a pile of clothing which was half the height of the collection bin.

The clothing was not sorted, washed or ironed just a jumbled heap.

What happens to the soggy mess when it rains?

Did recent strong winds blow it over Raymond St?

Such donations create a great deal of work for the charity workers, probably costing more in labour than the ‘donation’ is worth.

The donors have used the outside of the collection bin as a rubbish disposal.

Have people no sense of proportion or pride?

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Kiama Rotary’s John Worstencroft is hoping for a big turnout at the club’s 24th annual Antiques, Art and Retro Fair at the Kiama Leisure Centre on the weekend. Picture: GEORGIA MATTSTHE South Coast’s biggest antique fair is set to take place in Kiama this weekend, when the Kiama Rotary Club hosts its 24th annual Antiques, Art and Retro Fair at the Kiama Leisure Centre.
Nanjing Night Net

The fair is the club’s major fund-raiser for the year.

Organisers are expecting more than 1000 people to pass through the doors.

“It’s become really well-established now and would easily be the biggest fair on the South Coast,” Kiama Rotary Club member and fair co-ordinator John Worstencroft said.

“We get a lot of people from the Kiama area but we get other people who will come from Sydney, Tenterfield, Canberra – anywhere across the state.”

The fair offers people the opportunity to have items appraised and the club will also help people who are looking to sell items.

“A lot of people might have something around the house that they want to know a bit more about, how old it is or what it’s worth, and for $5 they can have an item appraised,” Mr Worstencroft said.

“If somebody wants to sell an item, we can help facilitate that for a commission that will go towards our efforts.”

Last year’s fair raised about $12,000 for the club and they are hoping for a similar figure this year to help them with their work in Papua New Guinea.

“We have a sister club in Madang in Papua New Guinea that we sort of adopted and we’ll be focusing a lot of the money we raise to help them,” Mr Worstencroft said.

“We’ve sent a few containers worth of supplies to help them with things like education and health care and we want to do more to help them improve their schools and hospitals.”

The fair will take place from 10am-5pm on Saturday and 10am-4pm on Sunday. Entry is $10 for adults, $7 for concessions. Accompanying children are free.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Byron Bay band In Hearts Wake played to a packed house last November.A YOUTH concert which took place in Kiama late last year has been hailed a success.
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The concert took place at The Pavilion on November 30.

It was organised by the Kiama Youth Centre’s event management team, a group of eight young people whose role is to organise entertainment events for young people under the guidance of senior youth worker Andrew Chatfield.

Music NSW’s Indent program chose the team to host Byron Bay metalcore band In Hearts Wake to perform at The Pavilion.

Indent toured In Hearts Wake throughout NSW, with Kiama being the last stop on the tour.

“The concert was the highest attended of all shows on the Indent tour with 265 paying audience members, emphasising how successful and well planned the event was,” council’s report said.

The event was funded by Indent and staffed and coordinated by the Youth Centre’s event management team.

The team were responsible for co-ordinating the support bands, setting and packing up the venue, performing door and canteen duties, liaising with security, stage management and assisting with production.

“Local bands also received the opportunity to perform with an established national act, providing inspiration and an experience they will never forget,” the report said.

“In Hearts Wake also performed a Q&A session with the support bands.”

The Q&A and concert were filmed and will be posted to the Youth Centre’s Facebook page.

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Wildlife carers are asking dog owners to tether their pets at night after a pregnant koala died following a vicious attack on North Stradbroke Island on January 2.
Nanjing Night Net

Two dogs attacked the koala, named Bulla, in the Terra Bulla Leumeah Conservation area, near Myora Springs.

Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital said Bulla was euthanised a day after the attack, which left the koala in shock and with a fractured right arm, a dislocated left knee and about 20 bites.

Straddie vet Jade Patterson calmed the animal and anaesthetised her to conduct a thorough physical examination, bandage her arms and leg and administer antibiotics.

Bulla died at Australia Zoo, where she had been in intensive care. The tiny joey in her pouch also died.

Island koala expert Romane Cristescu said Bulla also had a juvenile koala on her back but the pair were separated during the attack.

Ms Cristescu said the injuries were so severe vets said her chances of survival had been slim and her recovery would have involved multiple surgeries and months of care.

Australia Zoo vets asked pet owners to confine cats and dogs at night.

“This attack has resulted in two, possibly three, koala deaths and could have been prevented if the dogs were tied up at night.”

Ms Cristescu thanked the Straddie Flyer for taking Bulla to the mainland for free and Redland City Council for funds to buy the drugs and equipment.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Redland City Council has knocked back a request to install free public wi-fi in four main city centres.
Nanjing Night Net

Instead, it’s going to extend the free wi-fi service in Capalaba and Victoria Point libraries.

A report to the council said it would cost $88,000 to set up the service in the four hubs and $11,000 a year to keep those services running.

Division 2 councillor Craig Ogilvie said he was disappointed free wi-fi wouldn’t be installed in four business hubs across the city.

“This is a small investment to make for the vitality of our town centres and it takes us from being Redland Shire to being Redland City,” he said.

“For less than $1 a resident, we would have had a service that would have brought in business and enticed young and old into these areas that need revitalising.”

Mayor Karen Williams opposed the wi-fi move, saying it was up to businesses to provide those services, which were not core council activities.

In a July visit to Redlands, Local Government Minister David Crisafulli said free wi-fi gave Townsville’s CBD a much-needed boost.

He also promised the council $200,000 to help refurbish the Bloomfield Street town square, with some of that money going to public wi-fi there.

The council also decided not to investigate using its own broadband system to assist businesses unable to access high-speed networks.

“Businesses are losing productivity and leaving town because they can’t get high-speed broadband and we should at least investigate allowing businesses to tap into council’s broadband,” Cr Ogilvie said.

Cr Williams said free wi-fi would not be necessary as the National Broadband Network was coming to the city earlier than expected and would be in Redland Bay by 2016.

She said she was optimistic developments at Toondah Harbour and Weinam Creek ferry terminal would increase the city’s chances of getting NBN.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

WE are born 78 per cent water. To think about it blows my mind, and there’s no time I think about it more than in the midst of a central Victorian summer.
Nanjing Night Net

For those of us who depend on tank water to survive, it’s even more of an obsession.

Weeks measured out in the likelihood of rain – pouring precious bucket loads onto the trees that need it most – one eye always on the CFA website.

In the weeks of relentless heat, it’s water that keeps us sane.

Our brains and hearts are mostly water. It’s no wonder that when we take a break from work and school and all the other obligations of our busy lives, we are drawn to water.

To the coast, to rivers, to lakes… lured, as Hermann Hesse wrote, by the voice of life… the perpetual movement and caress of water.

Water crashing onto rocks and beaches, water carving a path through the landscape in search of the sea, water gently lapping against the trees and jetties of inland lakes – a lazy arvo at the local pool.

Wherever we are, we find our water.

Last week we found ours in Warrnambool, where the vast sky meets the bluest of blue oceans.

I’ve always been terrified by the sea, or more precisely what lies beneath its surface.

I’m the guy who paddles in the shallows, reciting James Joyce’s perfect line fromUlysses, “The sea, the snotgreen sea, the scrotumtightening sea.”

But last week I followed my water-loving sister (I think she might be about 98 per cent) into the pounding surf – a boogie board strapped to my quivering wrist.

For the best part of an hour, Iwasthe water – squealing like a boy as each wave thrust me like flotsam to the shore – sea foam caressing my skin.

Heading back inland the next day, I finally understood the allure of the big blue; why 85 per cent of Australians live a stone’s throw from the coast.

The smell of the sea quickly faded as we drove through parched bush and farmland towards home – the baked clay and cicada chorus of a Strathfieldsaye summer.

The following morning, miraculously, the heavens opened.

The gutters overflowed with the sheer volume of water, and drenched to the skin, we filled buckets and ferried them to the rainwater tank – not wanting to waste one lifegiving drop.

As I stood on the ladder emptying buckets, thunder cracking overhead, I thought of a story my dad told me as a kid.

That the water I was pouring had probably been to Africa and the North Pole… Genghis Khan may have drunk it… Cleopatra might have bathed in it…

Maybe it was a wave on a Warrnambool beach.

“We’re all water in different containers,” Yoko Ono wrote to John Lennon.

“Someday we’ll evaporate together.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.